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PCT Day 98 Trinity Alps Wilderness 

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23rd July 2015

Mileage 25 (40km)

Bushcamp (1550) to Ridgecamp (1575)

I woke in the early hours of the morning from the cold and was unable to get back to sleep. Should I eat something to get my metabolism warmed up, I thought to myself. The condensation from the cold night air soaked my tent and sleeping bag. Normally an early riser I failed to get moving, I wanted my friend the sun to help me out of bed.

I packed the wet gear and set off on nice easy graded trails. Smoke filled the valleys. The trail grapevine told of a fire in Napa Valley, many miles away. The smoke being carried by the winds to choke the view of the jagged mountain ranges of the Trinity Alps. I was really looking forward to this section of trail.

We seem to have found ourself in a large bubble of hikers. Our small group of four hikers, Mr & Mrs Smith, Teflon and myself (Shepherd) has swollen to about 14 of us. We all walk at about the same pace and the same distance each day and all the hikers are cool company to be with.

During the day we meet at each successive watering point. Campsites can be limited in areas of the rocky ridgelines. When the sun sank low in the west we made our way to a small known campsite on an exposed rocky ridge overlooking the Trinity Alps Wilderness.

It was only a small camp according to the guidebook, big enough for 1 tent. We managed to find enough space for 9 tents. I was in a rock covered area but fine. 

One of my favourite times of day is dinner time. We always find a communal area to cook and swap stories. That end of day socialising is one of the great experinces of hiking the PCT. I’m happy to share the experience with similar great people.

As I sat in my tent waiting for my eyes to close I could hear calling from cattle in a nearby meadow below. Some of them have loud cowbells. How is it that cattle are aloud to graze in wilderness areas? 

Sunrise
10am
wild raspberries
picking and eating wild raspberries
teflon, picking and eating wild raspberries

Next : Day 99 Loving Northern California

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About the Author:
Brad is an Australian who has completed the hiking Triple Crown after he hiked the Pacific Crest Trail, Continental Divide Trail and Appalachian Trail. He has hiked on every continent (except Antarctica) and has cycled from Alaska to Ecuador. He is an expert on outdoor gear currently living in Chile.

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6 thoughts on “PCT Day 98 Trinity Alps Wilderness ”

  1. That was an awesome camp spot. When we went back at the end of May this year to hike the section that we had to miss due to fire closures last year, we camped in the exact same spot. When we woke up in the morning, the entire valley was filled with clouds. The Trinity Alps are amazing.

    Reply
    • Wow, it was one of the most amazing sections, I thought that fire was recent. Would have been amazing with the clouds in the valley.

      Reply
  2. The Bureau of Land Management and I believe some of the United States Forest Service have grazing leases that ranchers buy. These are not usually yearly leases, but long term leases. This has been a long standing practice in the west and it has come into some controversy in recent years. I, being a rancher and a hiker, enjoy hearing the cowbells and the friendly faces of the cattle, but I understand others concern.

    Reply

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